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10 American dollars | Eagle

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Product features
Buying premium -0.50
Selling premium 11%
Pure weight 15.05
Purity 900/1.000 - 21,6 carat
Dimensions 26,90 mm x 2,02 mm
Manufacturer United States Mint
Packaging The 10 American dollars - Eagle is packed in a plastic coin pouch
Certificate N.a.
Detailed product description
The American 10 dollars, or Eagle, is a historic gold coin minted in 21,6 carat gold with a pure gold content of 15,05 grams. The Eagle comes in three different designs - the Turban Head, the Liberty Head and the Indian Head - and is a popular coin, both among numismats and investors.
 

10 American dollars - Eagle

The American Eagle was first minted in 1795 after the United States Congress, under President George Washington, introduced a law that established the existence of US currencies and their specifications. That law is known as The Mint Act of 1792. Regular production of the American Eagle eventually ran from 1795 to 1804, when President Thomas Jefferson stopped the coins of the Eagles and from 1838 to 1933, when President Franklin D. Roosevelt stopped producing all gold coins and even banned the possession of the coin, and gold in general (The Gold Reserve Act).
 
From 1795 to 1804, the $10 Turban Head was in circulation. When the value of gold skyrocketed and people consciously began to melt coins for their pure gold content, President Thomas Jefferson stopped the production of gold Eagles. 34 years later, the gold $10 coin was put back on the market. This time with a different design. From 1838 to 1907, the $10 Liberty Head was in circulation.
 
In 1904 President Theodore Roosevelt wrote a letter to the Secretary of the Treasury at that time, Leslie M. Shaw: "I think the state of our coinage is artistically of atrocious hideousness. Would it be possible, without asking permission of Congress, to employ a man like Saint-Gaudens to give us a coinage which would have some beauty?". And so it happened; sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens would spend his last living years devoted to the American Eagle coins.
 
His original design of the $10 coins also featured the image of Lady Liberty, with a laurel wreath on her head. But at the request of President Roosevelt, he added an Indian feather head to the portrait after receiving a letter from the President in 1907: "I feel very strongly that on at least one coin we ought to have the Indian feather headdress. It is distinctly American, and very picturesque. Couldn't you have just such a head as you have now, but with the feather headdress?". That same year, Augustus Saint-Gaudens died of cancer. The gold $10 - Indian Head would remain in production until 1933.
 

Purity & weight

The purity and alloy of the golden Eagle has undergone several adjustments throughout history2. From 1837, the Eagle was minted in a purity of 900/1.000 (21,6 carats), with an alloy consisting of copper and silver and weighed 16,7 grams. From 1838, silver was no longer added to the alloy of the Eagle and the coin consisted of 90% gold and 10% copper.
 
2: Originally, the Eagle was minted in 22 carat gold (916,7/1.000) with an alloy of silver and copper - where the silver could not weigh more than half of the alloy - and weighed 270 grains (1 grain = 64,8 mg), or 17,50 grams. When in 1834 the value of gold relative to silver changed from 15:1 to 16:1 (that means that 16 units of silver have the same value as one unit of gold), the Mint lowered the purity of the gold to 899,2/1.000, which amounted to a purity of 21,58 carats. The same purity would be adjusted for the last time in 1837.
 

Design of the American 10 dollars - Eagle

The American Eagle comes in three different designs, the Turban Head, the Liberty Head and the Saint-Gaudens Indian Head, which are, in  return, also produced in different versions. Given the rarity of the $10 - Turban Head, we're only discussing the design of the Liberty & Indian Head below.
 
Liberty Head | 1838 - 1907
On the obverse you can see the portrait of a woman in Greco-Roman style, looking to the left. On her head she wears a crown with ‘Liberty’. On her neck, at the bottom right, you will find the initials of the chief engraver of the United States Mint at that time; James B. Longacre. Surrounding the portrait are 13 stars, representing the original provinces of America (New Hampshire, Massachusetts Bay, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia). At the bottom of the coin you will find the year of issue.
 
On the back you can see the heraldic eagle with shield, which symbolizes the nation. In his left claw he holds three arrows, in his right an olive branch. Around the coin you will see ‘United States of America’ and at the bottom the face value of the coin ‘ten d.’. From 1866 the slogan ‘In God we trust’ was added on the other side of the coins; it was placed in a ribbon above the eagle.
 
Saint- Gaudens Indian Head | 1907 - 1933
On the obverse you see Lady Liberty, the personification of the United States depicted with an Indian feather head that says ‘Liberty’. Some of her locks come out from under her feather head. At the top of the portrait are 13 stars, representing the original provinces of America (New Hampshire, Massachusetts Bay, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, Represent South Carolina and Georgia). At the bottom you will find the year of issue.
 
On the reverse you will see an eagle on a branch. He holds an olive branch in his claws. Next to the eagle you will find the former slogan of the United States ‘E Pluribus Unum’ (‘One from many'). On top you see 'United States of America'. At the bottom you can find the face value of the coin ' ten dollars'. President Theodore Roosevelt had expressly asked Saint-Gaudens not to include the slogan 'In God we trust' in the new design. He thought that it was an insult to religion, knowing that the coins would circulate equally within the criminal environments. From 1908, however, the slogan was placed on the coins after all, left from the eagle. 
 

Buying a gold 10 American dollars - Eagle

The 10 American dollars - Eagle and other gold coins are perfectly suitable as a purchase of physical gold. Gold coins are not taxed because they are considered monetary gold. And while all the gold coins offered by Argentor have been tested for authenticity, they are not delivered with a certificate of authenticity. That, unlike gold bars.
 

Selling a gold 10 American dollars - Eagle

You are more than welcome in our office to sell your gold 10 American dollars - Eagle coin(s). You needn't make an appointment to do so.
 
Our buying prices are adapted every minute to the gold actual rate and will be hedged once you present your coin(s) in our office. You can always check our live buying prices on this page.
Kiyoh
Kiyoh
Argentor Essayeurs
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Kyriacos Ktenas
Phone line busy at times but with patience all is well
19-04-2024
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altijd duidelijke afspraken.
10-04-2024
Thomas
super vlotte en correcte afhandeling!
07-04-2024
Jean-Claude
Ce n'est pas ma première expérience chez Argentor. Choix de produits étendu quoique certaines "primes de ventes" me paraissent un peu surfaites ! Globalement satisfait, envois en temps et en heure sécurisés.
01-04-2024
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